Bray Wyatt Surpasses Becky Lynch And Roman Reigns To Become WWE’s No. 1 Merchandise Seller

WWE star Bray Wyatt on Firefly Fun House
WWE.com

Bray Wyatt isn’t just the top champion in WWE. He’s its top merchandise seller, too.

According to a report from the Wrestling Observer Newsletter (h/t Wrestling Inc), Wyatt is now selling more merchandise than any superstar in WWE. Although technically a heel performer, WWE has been captivating audiences for the past seven months since with a Jekyll and Hyde gimmick that spawned his sinister alter-ego “The Fiend” and has clearly made him one of WWE’s most popular superstars.

Back in August, Wyatt’s “Firefly Funhouse” play set box sold out instantly, and WWE has since created some very interesting merchandise for The Fiend, including a head lantern that retails for $99.99 on WWEShop.com but is currently unavailable on the Web site. Perhaps the most intriguing piece of Wyatt-related merchandise is The Fiend’s “Custom Handcrafted Title,” priced at an astounding $6,499.99 on WWEShop.com, which says the title “is made from the same materials and with the same craftsmanship you saw ‘The Fiend’ Bray Wyatt debut on SmackDown on Friday, November 29th 2019.”

While it’s unclear exactly how many of those titles WWE has sold, Wyatt’s sudden merchandising prowess does put him in rare air among the likes of some of the biggest stars in WWE.

For the better part of a decade, John Cena was the unquestioned merchandise king of WWE, but he was surpassed in that regard by Roman Reigns in 2018. Reigns’ run on top didn’t last long, however, as it was just a couple of months later that Reigns went on hiatus to battle leukemia for a second time, which paved the way for Becky Lynch to become WWE’s new No. 1 merchandise seller, perhaps making her the first female to ever top that list.

Just as Lynch’s meteoric rise to the top spot as WWE’s best merchandise mover came as a surprise, however, so too has Wyatt’s.

Although Wyatt—despite technically being a villain—has quickly become one of WWE’s most popular superstars, some questionable booking on the part of the creative team seemingly halted his momentum earlier this year. Most notably, Wyatt’s bizarrely booked match against Rollins at Hell in a Cell in October sure looked like it stopped Wyatt’s momentum before it could ever really get going. The good news for Wyatt, however, is that WWE made the smart decision to have The Fiend win the Universal Championship at Crown Jewel on October 31 after moving him to SmackDown, a move that has positioned him as the top champion on WWE’s new No. 1 brand.

The booking of Wyatt has been much better since he began feuding with Daniel Bryan, a star who is considerably more popular than Rollins, the latter of which is in the process of turning heel after developing a rocky relationship with the WWE Universe. Wyatt has had relatively few hiccups since he won the Universal Championship at the end of October, and his popularity continues to soar as he’s been positioned as the focal point of SmackDown. Overall, WWE has experienced a sharp decline in merchandise revenue on WWEShop.com over the past year, but it’s still an impressive feat for Wyatt to outrank names like Reigns, Rollins and Lynch, who have had more sustained pushes but don’t have the innovative gimmick that Wyatt has.

Wyatt’s rise to the spot as WWE’s top merchandise mover is a strong indicator that WWE fans are looking for unique characters who don’t fit the stereotypical mold.

Wyatt, of course, has perhaps the most distinctive gimmick WWE has created this decade, and much of the credit for that goes to the performances of Wyatt himself, who has remained committed to making such a gimmick work when it might be laughed out of the building if it wasn’t played by the right performer. The interesting part will be whether or not Wyatt can maintain that momentum going forward as WWE fans are notorious for turning on stars who are pushed strongly as top acts, as has been the case with Reigns, Rollins and, to a lesser extent, Lynch.

At one point, Wyatt was recently considered for a babyface turn, and long term, it will probably be impossible for WWE to avoid making him a full-fledged babyface. But with WWE pushing Wyatt far stronger than anyone in WWE at the moment, you never truly know how fans will respond to him in that role over the long haul.

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Bray Wyatt isn’t just the top champion in WWE. He’s its top merchandise seller, too.

According to a report from the Wrestling Observer Newsletter (h/t Wrestling Inc), Wyatt is now selling more merchandise than any superstar in WWE. Although technically a heel performer, WWE has been captivating audiences for the past seven months since with a Jekyll and Hyde gimmick that spawned his sinister alter-ego “The Fiend” and has clearly made him one of WWE’s most popular superstars.

Back in August, Wyatt’s “Firefly Funhouse” play set box sold out instantly, and WWE has since created some very interesting merchandise for The Fiend, including a head lantern that retails for $99.99 on WWEShop.com but is currently unavailable on the Web site. Perhaps the most intriguing piece of Wyatt-related merchandise is The Fiend’s “Custom Handcrafted Title,” priced at an astounding $6,499.99 on WWEShop.com, which says the title “is made from the same materials and with the same craftsmanship you saw ‘The Fiend’ Bray Wyatt debut on SmackDown on Friday, November 29th 2019.”

While it’s unclear exactly how many of those titles WWE has sold, Wyatt’s sudden merchandising prowess does put him in rare air among the likes of some of the biggest stars in WWE.

For the better part of a decade, John Cena was the unquestioned merchandise king of WWE, but he was surpassed in that regard by Roman Reigns in 2018. Reigns’ run on top didn’t last long, however, as it was just a couple of months later that Reigns went on hiatus to battle leukemia for a second time, which paved the way for Becky Lynch to become WWE’s new No. 1 merchandise seller, perhaps making her the first female to ever top that list.

Just as Lynch’s meteoric rise to the top spot as WWE’s best merchandise mover came as a surprise, however, so too has Wyatt’s.

Although Wyatt—despite technically being a villain—has quickly become one of WWE’s most popular superstars, some questionable booking on the part of the creative team seemingly halted his momentum earlier this year. Most notably, Wyatt’s bizarrely booked match against Rollins at Hell in a Cell in October sure looked like it stopped Wyatt’s momentum before it could ever really get going. The good news for Wyatt, however, is that WWE made the smart decision to have The Fiend win the Universal Championship at Crown Jewel on October 31 after moving him to SmackDown, a move that has positioned him as the top champion on WWE’s new No. 1 brand.

The booking of Wyatt has been much better since he began feuding with Daniel Bryan, a star who is considerably more popular than Rollins, the latter of which is in the process of turning heel after developing a rocky relationship with the WWE Universe. Wyatt has had relatively few hiccups since he won the Universal Championship at the end of October, and his popularity continues to soar as he’s been positioned as the focal point of SmackDown. Overall, WWE has experienced a sharp decline in merchandise revenue on WWEShop.com over the past year, but it’s still an impressive feat for Wyatt to outrank names like Reigns, Rollins and Lynch, who have had more sustained pushes but don’t have the innovative gimmick that Wyatt has.

Wyatt’s rise to the spot as WWE’s top merchandise mover is a strong indicator that WWE fans are looking for unique characters who don’t fit the stereotypical mold.

Wyatt, of course, has perhaps the most distinctive gimmick WWE has created this decade, and much of the credit for that goes to the performances of Wyatt himself, who has remained committed to making such a gimmick work when it might be laughed out of the building if it wasn’t played by the right performer. The interesting part will be whether or not Wyatt can maintain that momentum going forward as WWE fans are notorious for turning on stars who are pushed strongly as top acts, as has been the case with Reigns, Rollins and, to a lesser extent, Lynch.

At one point, Wyatt was recently considered for a babyface turn, and long term, it will probably be impossible for WWE to avoid making him a full-fledged babyface. But with WWE pushing Wyatt far stronger than anyone in WWE at the moment, you never truly know how fans will respond to him in that role over the long haul.

I'm a contributor for the SportsMoney team at Forbes, where I'll examine the interesting effect that sports have on business...and vice versa. I graduated from Louisiana...