Bianca Andreescu's Historic U.S. Open Win Attracts Record 3.4 Million Canadian Viewers

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Bianca Andreescu's historic U.S. Open championship on Saturday smashed television records for the sport in Canada.

Preliminary data from Numeris, a Canadian audience-measurement agency, confirmed that the Canadian's victory over Serena Williams in New York attracted a record audience of 3.4 million viewers, making it the most watched tennis broadcast ever on TSN and TSN's French sister network RDS, the sports specialty network announced.

More than 7 million unique Canadian viewers tuned in to watch some part of the match and audiences peaked at 5.3 million viewers at 5:59 Eastern in the second set as Andreescu put the match away to become the first ever Canadian singles player to win a Grand Slam championship.

The match ranked as the network's most-watched broadcast since the Toronto Raptors clinched the 2019 NBA championship live on TSN, CTV and RDS, the news release said. An average audience of 7.7 million in Canada watched Game 6 of the NBA Finals when the Raptors became the first NBA team outside the United States to win the championship.

In Toronto, the women's final had a share of 58% on TSN, meaning that more than half of all people watching television in Toronto on Saturday were tuned in to the women's final.

Canada has a population of about 37 million.

In the United States, ESPN said the women’s final averaged 3,219,000 viewers, while the men's final, won by Rafael Nadal in five sets, averaged 2.751 million viewers, up 33% from last year.

It's been a whirlwind 36 hours for Andreescu, who made the rounds on network television in the United States, including appearances on Live with Kelly and Ryan, The View, Good Morning America and The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.

A huge turnout is expected when Andreescu, who was born in the Toronto suburb of Mississauga, meets with the Canadian media on Wednesday morning at the Aviva Centre in Toronto, the site where she won the Rogers Cup tournament last month.

With her victory in New York, the 19-year-old jumped to No. 5 in the world rankings.

What's next for this tennis sensation?

Her coach, Sylvain Bruneau, told reporters in Montreal that the plan is for her to play at the China Open in Beijing, which starts on Sept. 28.

Andreescu hopes to hold on to her ranking because, after the China Open, she will likely qualify for the season-ending WTA Finals in Shenzhen, China, starting Oct. 28. Only the top eight players get invited and the prize money is enormous. The champion can take home as much as $4.725 million if she wins all three of her round-robin matches.

This year alone, Andreescu has won $6,060,485 in prize money in a meteoric rise. Prior to this year, her career earnings were $215,888. At the end of 2018, she was ranked No. 178 in the world.

Andreescu won $3.85 million for winning the U.S. Open. She took home $521,530 for winning the Rogers Cup and got a check for $1.35 million after capturing the BNP Paribas Open at Indian Wells, Calif., in March.




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Bianca Andreescu's historic U.S. Open championship on Saturday smashed television records for the sport in Canada.

Preliminary data from Numeris, a Canadian audience-measurement agency, confirmed that the Canadian's victory over Serena Williams in New York attracted a record audience of 3.4 million viewers, making it the most watched tennis broadcast ever on TSN and TSN's French sister network RDS, the sports specialty network announced.

More than 7 million unique Canadian viewers tuned in to watch some part of the match and audiences peaked at 5.3 million viewers at 5:59 Eastern in the second set as Andreescu put the match away to become the first ever Canadian singles player to win a Grand Slam championship.

The match ranked as the network's most-watched broadcast since the Toronto Raptors clinched the 2019 NBA championship live on TSN, CTV and RDS, the news release said. An average audience of 7.7 million in Canada watched Game 6 of the NBA Finals when the Raptors became the first NBA team outside the United States to win the championship.

In Toronto, the women's final had a share of 58% on TSN, meaning that more than half of all people watching television in Toronto on Saturday were tuned in to the women's final.

Canada has a population of about 37 million.

In the United States, ESPN said the women’s final averaged 3,219,000 viewers, while the men's final, won by Rafael Nadal in five sets, averaged 2.751 million viewers, up 33% from last year.

It's been a whirlwind 36 hours for Andreescu, who made the rounds on network television in the United States, including appearances on Live with Kelly and Ryan, The View, Good Morning America and The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.

A huge turnout is expected when Andreescu, who was born in the Toronto suburb of Mississauga, meets with the Canadian media on Wednesday morning at the Aviva Centre in Toronto, the site where she won the Rogers Cup tournament last month.

With her victory in New York, the 19-year-old jumped to No. 5 in the world rankings.

What's next for this tennis sensation?

Her coach, Sylvain Bruneau, told reporters in Montreal that the plan is for her to play at the China Open in Beijing, which starts on Sept. 28.

Andreescu hopes to hold on to her ranking because, after the China Open, she will likely qualify for the season-ending WTA Finals in Shenzhen, China, starting Oct. 28. Only the top eight players get invited and the prize money is enormous. The champion can take home as much as $4.725 million if she wins all three of her round-robin matches.

This year alone, Andreescu has won $6,060,485 in prize money in a meteoric rise. Prior to this year, her career earnings were $215,888. At the end of 2018, she was ranked No. 178 in the world.

Andreescu won $3.85 million for winning the U.S. Open. She took home $521,530 for winning the Rogers Cup and got a check for $1.35 million after capturing the BNP Paribas Open at Indian Wells, Calif., in March.




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