Hideo Kojiima Does Not Want You To Watch This 49-Minute-Long 'Death Stranding' TGS Trailer

Credit: Kojima prodcutions

Want to know what you're actually going to do in Death Stranding? In any sort of real way? We've managed to see a surprising amount of Hideo Kojiima's new game without getting much of an idea of what it actually is, which is as much of a testament to editing as it is to the implacable strangeness of the Metal Gear Solid. He's not unreasonable, however, so at Tokyo Game Show he's decided to answer our calls and actually show off the gameplay on a fundamental level with a whopping 49 minute trailer that takes us through nearly an hour in the life of a Death Stranding player. There's only one thing: the man himself would prefer that you didn't watch it:

In case you count yourself among the many that said that wanted to know what the game was about, here's a hefty dose of the world's most advanced walking sim(not a bad thing!):

I can respect Kojiimas idea that you shouldn't watch this, as antithetical to modern game marketing as it is. You can't really ruin a game like Call of Duty with a trailer: there are guns and you fire after aiming down sights, etc. But if a game is designed to be a new mechanical experience, part of the game has to be discovering those mechanics. So if you know anything about the game going in, the game automatically becomes a different experience. That experience should still be able to hold up, of course, but there exists the platonic ideal of the experience in the creator's head, and in this case, it's one where you don't know anything, and haven't watched that trailer.

I think a lot about The Unfinished Swan, a game that couldn't quite hold my attention throughout its runtime but featured one of the best opening moments I've ever seen in any game, ever. It was just a blank white screen with a black reticule, and that was it. You had to sort of push buttons until you figured out what was happening, and eventually one of them through a ball of black ink at the world. You kept doing it until you realized what was happening: you were painting a blank white world with black ink until you could make out shapes and find your way. Literally any knowledge of that system would have ruined that moment, and for me that would be a real loss.

So watch with care. Death Stranding comes out on November 8, and it's going to be weird.

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Credit: Kojima prodcutions

Want to know what you're actually going to do in Death Stranding? In any sort of real way? We've managed to see a surprising amount of Hideo Kojiima's new game without getting much of an idea of what it actually is, which is as much of a testament to editing as it is to the implacable strangeness of the Metal Gear Solid. He's not unreasonable, however, so at Tokyo Game Show he's decided to answer our calls and actually show off the gameplay on a fundamental level with a whopping 49 minute trailer that takes us through nearly an hour in the life of a Death Stranding player. There's only one thing: the man himself would prefer that you didn't watch it:

In case you count yourself among the many that said that wanted to know what the game was about, here's a hefty dose of the world's most advanced walking sim(not a bad thing!):

I can respect Kojiimas idea that you shouldn't watch this, as antithetical to modern game marketing as it is. You can't really ruin a game like Call of Duty with a trailer: there are guns and you fire after aiming down sights, etc. But if a game is designed to be a new mechanical experience, part of the game has to be discovering those mechanics. So if you know anything about the game going in, the game automatically becomes a different experience. That experience should still be able to hold up, of course, but there exists the platonic ideal of the experience in the creator's head, and in this case, it's one where you don't know anything, and haven't watched that trailer.

I think a lot about The Unfinished Swan, a game that couldn't quite hold my attention throughout its runtime but featured one of the best opening moments I've ever seen in any game, ever. It was just a blank white screen with a black reticule, and that was it. You had to sort of push buttons until you figured out what was happening, and eventually one of them through a ball of black ink at the world. You kept doing it until you realized what was happening: you were painting a blank white world with black ink until you could make out shapes and find your way. Literally any knowledge of that system would have ruined that moment, and for me that would be a real loss.

So watch with care. Death Stranding comes out on November 8, and it's going to be weird.

I'm a freelance writer whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, The New York Times, The New Republic, IGN.com, Wired and more. I cover social games, video games, technol...