MLB Sets Postseason Shares Record Of Over $88 Million For 2018

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Unless you are a Boston Red Sox fan, let’s face it, the World Series didn’t come across as compelling. Ratings were down, largely due to the shine being worn off on the Red Sox being in such a strong position to win it all heading in (it's hard to believe there are now young adults that never have known the long-suffering Red Sox fans went through prior to 2004).

But if the numbers were down on television, they certainly weren’t down at the gate based on numbers released by Major League Baseball on Monday.

Each year, the league releases what are called “Postseason shares”, the amount of money that comes back to the players in the form of bonuses that are part of the collective bargaining agreement between the players and owners. A pool of money is collected for each phase of the postseason: 50% of the gate from the Wild Card games; 60% of the gate receipts from the first three games of the Division Series; 60% of the gate receipts from the first four games of the League Championship Series; and 60% of the gate receipts from the first four games of the World Series. As to why this bonus system was put in place, beyond the players getting extra green in their wallet, the owners have long seen the bonus system as a way to prevent players from throwing games as part of any gambling scam. The teams determine who get full or partial shares, or “cash awards”, and the decision as to who gets the extra green can fall outside just players. Often times, clubhouse personnel can receive the bonus money.

All told, 10 clubs benefitted from the Postseason shares system in 2018. Since the second Wild Card was added in November of 2011, all 10 teams have been in the postseason. If that sounds rhetorical, prior to the two Wild Card games, second-place finishers that were non-Wild Card clubs got “postseason shares” without making the postseason. For example, the Braves, Indians, Angels, and Giants got “Second-Place Finishers (Non-Wild Card Clubs)” shares.

For 2018.the total pool for the players in the 10 teams that made the postseason was an all-time high of $88,188,633.49 a 4% increase from the prior record of 2017 of $84,500,432.15. A full Postseason share for the 2018 World Series Champion Boston Red Sox was worth $416,837.72, while a full share for the National League Champion Los Angeles Dodgers totaled $262,027.49. That was compared to $438,901.57 for the 2017 World Champion Houston Astros and $259,722.14 for the 2017 NL Champion Dodgers. For further comparison, the 2016 World Series Champion Chicago Cubs got $368,871.59 and the 2016 AL Champion Indians got $261,804.65. 

The breakdown by the clubs that received postseason shares is as follows:

World Series Champions

Boston Red Sox (Share of Players’ Pool: $31,747,908.06; value of each of full share: $416,837.72) – The Red Sox issued 66 full shares, a total of 10.025 partial shares and eight cash awards.

National League Champions

Los Angeles Dodgers (Share of Players’ Pool: $21,165,272.04; value of each of full share: $262,027.49) – The Dodgers issued 67 full shares, a total of 13.290 partial shares and 24 cash awards.

League Championship Series Runners-Up

Houston Astros (Share of Players’ Pool: $10,582,636.02; value of each of full share: $154,656.05) – The Astros issued 56 full shares, a total of 12.220 partial shares and five cash awards.

Milwaukee Brewers (Share of Players’ Pool: $10,582,636.02; value of each of full share: $122,957.13) – The Brewers issued 64 full shares, a total of 21.051 partial shares and four cash awards. 

Division Series Runners-Up

Atlanta Braves (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,866,130.59; value of each of full share: $40,375.74) – The Braves issued 65 full shares, a total of 5.875 partial shares and seven cash awards.

Cleveland Indians (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,866,130.59; value of each of full share: $37,040.29) – The Indians issued 67 full shares, a total of 8.570 partial shares and 10 cash awards.

Colorado Rockies (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,866,130.59; value of each of full share: $40,335.96) – The Rockies issued 58 full shares, a total of 12.833 partial shares and seven cash awards.

New York Yankees (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,866,130.59; value of each of full share: $43,081.55) – The Yankees issued 45 full shares, a total of 21.470 partial shares and two cash awards. 

Wild Card Game Runners-Up

Chicago Cubs (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,322,829.50; value of each of full share: $16,155.34) – The Cubs issued 68 full shares and a total of 13.882 partial shares.

Oakland Athletics (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,322,829.50; value of each of full share: $19,760.35) – The A’s issued 57 full shares, a total of 9.083 partial shares and 15 cash awards.

Source: Major League Baseball

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Getty

Unless you are a Boston Red Sox fan, let’s face it, the World Series didn’t come across as compelling. Ratings were down, largely due to the shine being worn off on the Red Sox being in such a strong position to win it all heading in (it's hard to believe there are now young adults that never have known the long-suffering Red Sox fans went through prior to 2004).

But if the numbers were down on television, they certainly weren’t down at the gate based on numbers released by Major League Baseball on Monday.

Each year, the league releases what are called “Postseason shares”, the amount of money that comes back to the players in the form of bonuses that are part of the collective bargaining agreement between the players and owners. A pool of money is collected for each phase of the postseason: 50% of the gate from the Wild Card games; 60% of the gate receipts from the first three games of the Division Series; 60% of the gate receipts from the first four games of the League Championship Series; and 60% of the gate receipts from the first four games of the World Series. As to why this bonus system was put in place, beyond the players getting extra green in their wallet, the owners have long seen the bonus system as a way to prevent players from throwing games as part of any gambling scam. The teams determine who get full or partial shares, or “cash awards”, and the decision as to who gets the extra green can fall outside just players. Often times, clubhouse personnel can receive the bonus money.

All told, 10 clubs benefitted from the Postseason shares system in 2018. Since the second Wild Card was added in November of 2011, all 10 teams have been in the postseason. If that sounds rhetorical, prior to the two Wild Card games, second-place finishers that were non-Wild Card clubs got “postseason shares” without making the postseason. For example, the Braves, Indians, Angels, and Giants got “Second-Place Finishers (Non-Wild Card Clubs)” shares.

For 2018.the total pool for the players in the 10 teams that made the postseason was an all-time high of $88,188,633.49 a 4% increase from the prior record of 2017 of $84,500,432.15. A full Postseason share for the 2018 World Series Champion Boston Red Sox was worth $416,837.72, while a full share for the National League Champion Los Angeles Dodgers totaled $262,027.49. That was compared to $438,901.57 for the 2017 World Champion Houston Astros and $259,722.14 for the 2017 NL Champion Dodgers. For further comparison, the 2016 World Series Champion Chicago Cubs got $368,871.59 and the 2016 AL Champion Indians got $261,804.65. 

The breakdown by the clubs that received postseason shares is as follows:

World Series Champions

Boston Red Sox (Share of Players’ Pool: $31,747,908.06; value of each of full share: $416,837.72) – The Red Sox issued 66 full shares, a total of 10.025 partial shares and eight cash awards.

National League Champions

Los Angeles Dodgers (Share of Players’ Pool: $21,165,272.04; value of each of full share: $262,027.49) – The Dodgers issued 67 full shares, a total of 13.290 partial shares and 24 cash awards.

League Championship Series Runners-Up

Houston Astros (Share of Players’ Pool: $10,582,636.02; value of each of full share: $154,656.05) – The Astros issued 56 full shares, a total of 12.220 partial shares and five cash awards.

Milwaukee Brewers (Share of Players’ Pool: $10,582,636.02; value of each of full share: $122,957.13) – The Brewers issued 64 full shares, a total of 21.051 partial shares and four cash awards. 

Division Series Runners-Up

Atlanta Braves (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,866,130.59; value of each of full share: $40,375.74) – The Braves issued 65 full shares, a total of 5.875 partial shares and seven cash awards.

Cleveland Indians (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,866,130.59; value of each of full share: $37,040.29) – The Indians issued 67 full shares, a total of 8.570 partial shares and 10 cash awards.

Colorado Rockies (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,866,130.59; value of each of full share: $40,335.96) – The Rockies issued 58 full shares, a total of 12.833 partial shares and seven cash awards.

New York Yankees (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,866,130.59; value of each of full share: $43,081.55) – The Yankees issued 45 full shares, a total of 21.470 partial shares and two cash awards. 

Wild Card Game Runners-Up

Chicago Cubs (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,322,829.50; value of each of full share: $16,155.34) – The Cubs issued 68 full shares and a total of 13.882 partial shares.

Oakland Athletics (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,322,829.50; value of each of full share: $19,760.35) – The A’s issued 57 full shares, a total of 9.083 partial shares and 15 cash awards.

Source: Major League Baseball

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